Astounding feat.

Wading into the intolerable drivel called CWMG requires tremendous courage and tenacity. To suffer that bs, yet think logically and clearly, and to bring out a wealth of information that has the potential to de-brainwash and inform millions of people is an astounding feat.

In these times, it is like almost a bhageeratha prayatna.

Agneya does that here – http://www.scribd.com/doc/30729870/Gandhi-A-True-Mahatma-Complete , as he analyses Gandhi, based on CWMG and related materials.

He refers itihasas, puranas and the vedas, as well as Koran, Hadiths and Bible to bring out the roots of the imaginations and the inconsistencies that pervade Gandhi’s work.

He recognizes Gandhi as a tamasic person, completely under the  influence of church propaganda- considering dogmatic piety, self-flagellation and suffering alone as pathways to reaching god. Gandhi is also revealed as submissive towards ‘allah’ and Koran. In fact, considering Gandhi’s efforts to blackmail ‘hindus’ into inaction in the face of muslim aggression during the time of partition, Gandhi could also be considered to have indirectly followed the koranic call of destroying kaffirs. Thus Gandhi’s claim to have been a true muslim may be true in more ways than one.

In this excellent book, to nitpick, there is one small error when the author says at page 151, “The social activism he (Gandhi) practiced in South Africa, with its focus on ahimsa and literary critiques of government policy, in reality contained qualities belonging more to the brahmana than the kshatriya“. Not true. brahmana is inclined towards realisation of brahma. Gandhi was inclined towards obtaining the halo of a suffering-celebrity-martyr, similar to how church portrays Jesus. Such tendency, to be influenced by an image and to desire to shape oneself in such image, is characteristic of sudra. It is born of a tamasic predisposition, which the author correctly discerns in Gandhi. Further, Gandhi’s ahimsa was different from the ahimsa that  bharatiya darshanas advocate, it was actually himsa as the author identifies in page 131.

In this book the author also touches upon the non-literal meaning of the vedas, which most west-educated ‘indologists’ fail to comprehend. In many places the author also discusses concepts of bharatiya samskriti in lucid yet profound manner, benefiting the reader in multiple ways.

Just as the waters of ganga brought by Bhageeratha’s prayatna liberated his anscestors, the wisdom contained in this book through Agneya’s prayatna has the potential to liberate many indians from the tamas of gandhian-western influence.

One of the best books ever.

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