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Shri Senthil Raja commented in a previous blog

“I think, we should not waste our time in explaining to those who say “Its individual wish to marry any one”..        …….

Instead of explaining things to them, which their closed mindset will never open up, we have to restrict ourselves in exposing their double standard, and moral hollowness…”

 This blog is about what he refers to as “closed mindsets”, that may sometimes appear as “will never open up”.

 

When we plant a mango seed, it will grow up to produce mango fruit.

The seeds of thought that we plant in our mind grow up to produce their characteristic fruit.

If we plant propaganda material found in yellow rags masquerading as english language newspapers and TV news channels, our minds will produce fruits of that nature.

Take the case of the blogger here, who, having been schooled in a convent run by nuns, has apparently internalized the western colonialist propaganda of people of dark color being ignorant, less ‘developed’, lower in the ‘evolutionary’ ladder, which lie incidentally drives the skin-cream industry all over the world. So, when she blogs on the role of prejudices and narrow mindsets in shaping societal attitudes, she inadvertently reflects her internalized prejudices. Herself a colored person in western nomenclature, she portrays darker people as having narrower mindset and discriminatory attitude towards people of lighter shade in the exact pattern that colonialists used to caricature dark colored natives as ‘primitive’, ‘narrow minded’, ‘ignorant of world’ etc., and themselves, white people, being more ‘evolved’, ‘modern’ and ‘liberal’, whose burden it is to emancipate their darker brethren- which propaganda was then used to enslave, genocide, plunder and displace native people from Africa, America, Australia and Asia. She further displays western propensity to stifle criticisms and dissenting voices, by refusing to post a comment critical of that article, given below –

“Is it necessary to caricature blacks as evil … when it is they who have been plundered, enslaved, genocided and put in reservations by the whites…?

 Indians traditionally respected black ‘krishna varna‘ more than white. eg., Sri Krishna, Sri Rama, Shiva bhagavan, Kali Ma, Draupadi, Arjuna, Krishna Dvaipayana (Vyasa) etc.

This article seems to follow the path of imperialists, that of demonizing people of color, caricaturing them as primitive, barbaric, childish, not evolved etc…

Disappointing, to put it mildly.

namaste

 

Thus, the ideas and thoughts that we expose ourselves to, influences and shapes our thinking in subconscious ways- even in those cases when it is done with the purpose of countering those very ideas, as this blog reveals.

However, such displayed behavior does not necessarily mean that the people’s minds are closed. Poisonous trees growing in a field does not mean that the field is capable of producing fruits of that nature only.

It only means that some de-weeding is required, followed by planting of good seeds.

Still, planting of good seeds by itself does not guarantee that the harvest would be automatically good. Ravana’s mind was seeded with good thoughts by his father Vishravas, who taught him veda and shastra. Yet, the seeds of selfish aggrandizement inherent in Ravana outgrew and displaced those of the good thoughts planted by his father. A more recent example is that of Rajasekara a.k.a Nithyananda, who despite being exposed to veda shastras allowed selfish duplicitous thoughts to overtake sense of righteousness.

Due to samskara of our past, seeds of weed may be present in our minds, which germinate at times. Also, seeds of weed dispersed by wind may land from neighboring fields.

So the fields of our minds needs to be kept weed-free through constant vigilance, planted with healthy seeds after turning over the hardened crust of set prejudices, regularly irrigated by attention and insights and well exposed to rays of illuminating consciousness, in order to produce edible crop.

Our ancestors did so and produced the best of the crops as veda darshana shastra purana, which seeds are still with us. Do we prove to be true sons and daughters of the soil, worthy descendents of our ancestors, or bonded farmers who buy GM seeds from westerners, destroy ecology, perennially depending on westerners for future seeds of thought ?

 

 

Notes.

1. Certain fields have been planted with poisonous plants so heavily that the numerous seeds of poisonous weeds present in that soil make any decent cultivation very tough proposition. It may be advisable, in such cases, to leave the field barren for some period, regularly uprooting the germinating weeds, until the seeds present in the soil get depleted before planting new crops. For faster results it may be necessary to burn that soil with the fire of enquiry, or waterlog it by immersing it in deluge of knowledge, or upturn that soil, burying it so deep that the seeds cannot germinate, by undergoing life transforming experience.

2. Certain regions are not conducive to certain crops. While bharatam has very fertile fields that can grow most plant varieties, certain parts of the world are not so and it is almost futile to try and grow similar varieties of plants in those fields. Even if they are grown forcefully, with much effort, its produce won’t taste the same, though, limited success may be had in controlled environments using fabricated glasshouses.

3. It is also meaningful to remember that the seeds of thoughts- both good and bad, are originally not inherent to the soil, that these are introduced separately, which then grow up and produce their respective fruits; that the original nature of the soil is seedless, plant less, still, dormant, pervaded by rays of illuminating consciousness, moistened by insightful attention. That original nature, realized our ancestors, tat twam asi.

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Gandhi: A True Sepoy

In the book “Gandhi: A True Mahatma ?“, author Agneya unravels the extent to which Gandhi was influenced by british indoctrination and christian propaganda. Gandhi stands revealed as a christian in all but name- christian in the sense of a person who has internalised the propaganda spread by church that ‘suffering’ and subservience to dogmas of New Testament is sole path to god’s blessings. He is also revealed as a person who is convinced about the superiority of the british and, by extension, as their being the rightful administrators over other people including Indians.  Having internalised church propaganda and convinced about superiority of british, he ventured to spread these ideas among indians,  surreptitiously, while taking the name of Sri Rama, Sri Krishna and in the pretext of being inspired by bhagavad gita, all of which are known to have powerful influence over indians. Gandhi is therefore revealed as a sepoy of the Western Empire, engaged in the act of converting his countrymen into subservient sepoys of empire like himself. Western Empire here refers to the aggrandizing empire building behaviour of the Romans that saw them conquering lands and enslaving people, which trait was displayed by the Church engaged in expanding and converting people into sheeps, by Islam plundering and enslaving people for the Caliphate, by various capitalists such as East India Companies and Hudson Bay Company looting other lands, paving way for colonialism, and by communists unleashing class war to usurp dictatorial power. This trait saw these people make use of any opportunity, be it religion, science, anthropology, history or linguistics, as tools for subjugating people, both physically and mentally. Their biggest victory is in converting other people into being their slaves, getting them to become a part of the empire, as a sepoy.

The usefulness of a sepoy is in his not being identified as a slave of the empire. Taking the name of Sri Rama, Sri Krishna and bhagavad gita helped Gandhi in maintaining the illusion of working in the interest of bharatiya samskriti. This then enabled him to play the role of spokesperson for India, thus furthering the interest of the empire.

The role played by Gandhi then provides lessons today regarding how subversion could be achieved intentionally or even subconsciously, how a person convinced that one particular path is the correct one- in Gandhi’s case, the path of suffering, assumedly shown by Jesus -then engages in converting people into becoming a part of the western empire.

How many such people are there nowadays, influenced by the western propaganda, sepoys of the empire themselves,  perhaps unable to recognize themselves as such, yet enjoying the power and pelf provided by the empire, venture to become spokesperson or activist for the ‘native’, but inevitably foster the interest of the empire ?

Tools of the Empire

In the course of history, western empire has used many tools for aggrandizement, viz., Roman imperialism, Catholic Church and its many offshoots, Islam, Capitalism, Colonialism, Communism, Nazism, Fascism, Racism, Nationalism etc. Today the western empire uses ‘capitalism’ as its primary tool. This was the tool that was intrumental in bringing about colonialism through East India Company, Hudson Bay Company etc. It accords paramountcy to materials and provide unbridled avenue for expressing greed. The enormous damage that this tool wrecks on environment is unmatched. It also severely damages the mind of people, converting them into materialistic zombies, white collared and blue collared labourers, automations, who act on cues.

Modern Sepoys

Many of the present day sepoys of the empire view the other tools as detrimental to ‘humanity’ and capitalism as ‘harbringer of development and modernity’. These people are vociferous in their criticism of other tools, but are blind-sided to the enormous damage that capitalism wrecks on ‘humanity’. They are, like all converted people, unable to see alternatives beyond what they are indoctrinated. So they see as possible alternative only the other tools of the empire. When some of them recognize alternative in indigenous traditions, they are eager to make such alternatives part of the empire.

Even when they are seen as arguing against the empire, they are actually only working for the empire, to make space for the ‘others’- the indigenous group they belong to, in the empire, to consolidate the merger with the empire. Though, in their influenced state of mind some of them may not realise it is so, and some others merely try to convince themselves that such is the best course.

Possible examples of such behaviour- An eminent ‘hindu’, in his varied criticism of the west consistently fails to identify or prosecute ‘capitalism’. A ‘nationalist hindu’ feels disturbed upon seeing criticism of capitalistic ideas and ventures to put up straw man arguments. An internet hindu interested in India’s development considers ‘progress of civilization’ on western terms.

Mutiny

Sustainable future lie in not spreading the aggrandizing rapacious empire. It lies in seeing the true nature of this empire, the various tools that it uses to gain its ends, the way in which it develops or appropriates new tools as it comes up against opposition, its insatiable appetite and attachment to material objects. It lies in growing out of the indoctrinations inculturated by the empire, to view it critically and to prosecute it. It is also inevitably linked to realizing the true purpose of life and knowledge of selfthe central objectives of bharatiya samskriti.

Rajiv Malhotra starts off his latest article admiring Christian Church, its longest history of continuous governance, tremendous track record of protecting its interests under all circumstances, its invention of corporate management procedures and floating of the first commercial multinationals, such as the Knights Templar.

It is said that whatever we give attention to, is reinforced in our minds. There is the sory of Maricha who wanted to stop thinking about Sri Rama and in the process tried to avoid using even the words having ‘ra’ alphabet. He only ended up reinforcing Sri Rama’s memory in his mind, went on to get killed by Sri Rama and achieved moksha.

Malhotra says he studied with interest the governance systems of various Christian denominations, both formally in seminary courses and through attendance of various Church conferences. It is possible that the long hours spent in such study will influence the mind of a person on those lines. Malhotra’s earlier articles available at www.rajivmalhotra.com show significant influence of dharmik thoughts even though mixed with a tendency to enter into dialogues with the adharmik people. His latest article shows enamoured admiration of christian church and compulsion to adopt their practices. This seems to be the story of a person who went to study the tactics of the enemy in order to fight them effectively, but ended up becoming like them. 

A sample of the influence of adharmik is seen in the way the enemies’ way of viewing things have been adopted by the student. He says ‘The Church has learned a great deal through trial and error and has thus become robust’. Here he personalises the Church, as a being with cognitive abilities that learns lessons and takes corrective measures and becomes robust in the process.

What is Church actually ?

A front for self-aggrandizing individuals to indulge themselves, protected from scrutiny of inquiring minds using the deceptive cover of godly sanction.

By seeing the ‘Church’ as an individual, who acquired the ability to survive many scandals through learning from trial and errors and developing robustness and resilience, the student loses sight of the bunch of selfish, self-aggrandizing individuals who constitute this organisation, who often work at cross purposes, who are themselves indoctrinated and brainwashed into losing all sense of righteousness and who perpetuate a continuous line of similar rapacious zombies. This delusion of the student in not noticing the true constituent of Church leads him to admire that mirage.

Under this delusion, losing sight of dharma, the student sees admirable qualities in the chimera, which he feels compelled to adopt. So he wants to ‘professionalize the governance of Hindu institutions’, which in effect means ‘ape the working of the Church’ in order to be as ‘robust and resilient’.

This leads the student to observe that ‘Indian laws require compliance with regulations pertaining to trusts, societies and associations that are based almost entirely on Western corporate rules of governance which originated in the Church’. In other words, he says, it is not Dharmashastras or Arthashastras that provide the legal methods for governance in India.
Obviously he fails to note that perhaps this is precisely the reason why the Indian legal system and administration is so pathetic, why corruption is so rampant.
When the system is shaped on the lines of example set by self-aggrandizing, selfish minds, what else can be expected ?
What else can result, but rampant corruption that is seen.

The student plumbs new depths with this statement – ‘there is much our gurus can learn from modern corporate governance’.
Sure, it will help them peddle their wares profitably.

He says – ‘our tradition has a long history of assimilating new ideas from everywhere and adapting itself’.
Last known, the fundamental text, the srutis, are the same as they were millenniums ago. Apart from parashara smriti no other smriti has been formulated for this yuga. Puranas, itihasas that provide guidance remain unadulterated, so far.
The deluded student has bitten the fancy line propagated by the british and later continued with by the marxists, that Indian culture is a thorough mixture of ideas ‘contributed’ by different invaders to this land and that it is these ‘contributions’ that makes it rich. That it has always been willing to accept ‘ideas from everywhere’ and to ‘adapt itself’!
By parrotting these lines of the invaders, the students shows the extend to which he has been indoctrinated.

He then claims- ‘There is a clear history of dharma that shows change and evolution’.
It is not dharma that changes. It is the perception and cognition of dharma that does. And the results are obvious in the state of affairs today.

He further claims- “The scandal of SN provided an opportunity to test how Hindus might collectively respond in crisis management”
Really ?
One crook caught with his pants down(figuratively) is a crisis for ‘Hindus’ ?

The delusion of seeing organizational entity in the place of bunch of crooked individuals carrying out their own nefarious designs was displayed by the student earlier in the case of Church. Here he does it again, seeing in the discomfiture of one crooked individual, a crisis for the majority of this one billion plus country and its diaspora.
The cause for this delusion is easy to find- his admiration for World Council of Churches and the Catholic Church whom he had credited with resilience and robustness earlier, for thriving despite scandals involving sexual abuse of even children. He would like to see played out, a similar performance by his chosen collective of ‘hindus’ in this hour of ‘crisis’.

A tendency displayed by those bitten by the bug of such delusion is to try and appropriate organisations for personal aggrandizement. The Gramscian ideas of influencing academic institutions and media as means to gain societal control stems from that. So he calls for a Hindu body to be brought in to play a responsible role, either an institution or a panel of elders, such that there would be fair play by the system and not prosecution by an utterly biased and corrupt media.
Effective skill in wordplay to obfuscate issues is frequently practiced by crooks. Those who draw inspiration from such crooks inevitably acquire similar characteristics. In effect what is being proposed is an organisation that will provide unscrupulous crooks such as Rajasekara a.k.a SN, support and legitimacy. Later such organisations will conveniently form platforms for further deplorable deeds on the pretext of lofty and altruistic reasons, like its source of inspiration- Church. 

The student then introduces a favored tool of his teacher into the article- the element of fear. His worst fears came true when he discovered the absence of any such mechanism like World Council of Churches with hindus!

He appreciates the several individuals who, like him, ‘performed commendably’ in their personal capacities trying to help bring ‘dharmic justice.’ by coming out in support of a crook! Fortunately,  such ‘noble attempts’ failed.

He admires the Church for developing its robustness, even though it took centuries to do so, ‘with considerable enterprise by numerous risk takers’. All that the enterprising people of church probably risked and lost were their sense of righteousness and morality, which fact the devout student overlooks in his eagerness to mold HDAS in Father Church’s image.
 
So he asks rhetorically, ‘are Hindus willing to go through such processes that are not instant successes and bring no personal benefit ?’,  it may be added, forgoing considerations of dharma, morality and letting HDAS and its Popes set corporate agendas.

Even though Malhotra admits that ‘SN did not make his position clear enough, and nor was he consistent in what he said to various persons from one day to the next’, he does not recognise precisely this moral vacilitation on part of SN as the primary cause of the crisis. This inability to distinguish adharma led him to come out in support of that charlatan when the scandal broke.
 
But the trained businessperson that he is, appreciates the ‘corporate’ style Non-Disclosure Agreement(NDA) drafted by an American corporate lawyer and signed by lots of persons as a standard corporate NDA. This evident weakness for ‘corporates’ leads him to champion the idea of ‘Hindus Inc.’ in the guise of being concerned about self-governing competence of ‘hindus’.

The deterioration in this student’s ability to discriminate the right from the wrong  is starkly evident when even after  some parents told him of their daughters being compromised by SN, he only wonders whether the NDA will provide legal protection as proof that any alleged sex was between consenting adults.

This self-appointed spokesman for ‘Manu and other past leaders’  says the goal to unify Hindu groups in social-political matters is necessary if Hinduism is to survive. The student has learnt well from his padre teachers whose refrain for each of their selfish acts are- ‘This is what God wants done’.

Revival of hinduism entails inculcating kshatriya competence among a large number of individuals, he notes, but conveniently forgoes the fact that kshatriya is also about upholding dharma. Morality is integral part of dharma. Also, kshatriyas, vyshyas and sudras are to be guided by brahmanas for proper running of society, person’s varna being based on behaviour, independent of parentage.

Then rhetoric – ‘Such a revival entails courageous experimentation, risk taking, enterprising attempts to engage the real issues as and when they happen’ – to justify his recent ‘education’ in the hands of church,  ‘It also involves getting inside the large scale institutional management of other religions in order to learn their strengths and weaknesses as well what we could borrow from them.’

Before concluding he introduces the insinuation that his critics may well be double agents engaged in feeding material to opponents of ‘hinduism’, which is a rehash of George Bush’s memorable- ‘If you are not with us, then you are with them’ line, one step away from ‘If you are not a believer like us, then you are a kaffir, heathen, fit to be killed off in the name of my one and only true God/Allah’.

What stands out in Malhotra’s article is the influence of church, which he seems unaware of.
 
Indians in the past have been known to shun the company of the unrighteous- mlecchas, and to engage in purifying acts if interacting with them became inevitable. The adharmic influence from mlecchas affects those who interact with them. Rajiv Malhotra’s article shows the effects of this.

Untouchables are the unrighteous, adharmis– those who have suppresed their moral compass or have abandoned it altogether. It is not a genetic trait. Environment and upbringing does influence it. But it is possible for a person born to an unrighteous person to become a brahmana, similarly, the progeny of a brahmana may also grow up to be unrighteous. Besides, an unrighteous person himself could later become righteous and vice versa. Ratnakara who became Maharshi Valmiki, Prahlada, son of Hiranyakashipu, Ravana, son of Vishravas, are examples.

It is consciousness of dharma and the willingness to adhere to dharma at all cost that differentiates the righteous from the unrighteous. Just as a body without atman is a dead body, material success without dharma putrifies. While kama and artha are essential for dharma to manifest, pursuing either at the cost of dharma is counterproductive.

Those who seek to learn from the unrighteous may realise late that the lessons are unrighteous, developed and perfected for unrighteous purposes, and that, by imbibing the unrighteous lessons they themselves become unrighteous.

“Who’s a good Hindu ?” asks realitycheck

More relevant question is “Who is a Hindu” in the first place.

Is there any spiritual text that lays down who is a hindu and who is not ?

Did Sri Rama, Sri Krishna, Adi Shankaracharya, etc., consider themselves ‘hindu’ ?

Why this affinity to this word that is not even a derivative of samskritam nor of this samskriti ?

If you want to identify yourself, identify yourself as bharateeya. Or maybe travel the path of ancient rishis who realized themselves as brahma.

Accepting a word given by people who were considered mleccha by the bharateeyas of the past is a sure indication of depravity that pervades this land at present.

A blogger attempts to trace the fissures in India’s society.

“Despite our country’s much-vaunted pluralism, Indians harbour a keen sense of difference, be it of language, religion or complexion.” 

Without this ‘difference’ how does pluralism exist in the first place ?

“The modern Indian state outlaws caste-based discrimination, while requiring “positive discrimination” for members of marginalised groups.”

Self contradictory. the so-called ‘positive’ discrimination is also caste based!

“Caste is a difficult and thorny category, its origins and evolution still murky.”

Agree, am always at a loss as to how come every fundamental text of bharata happens to be written by the so-called outcastes!
Ramayana by a jungle robber Ratnakar later called Maharshi Valmiki. Mahabharata and Gita by son of a fisherwoman named Vyasa. Vedas, Upanishads, Aranyakas, Brahamanas compiled by the same son of fisherwoman.

And these are the basic texts of bharatiya samskriti !

Am at a loss as to how come the ‘evil brahmins’ came to  accept these texts of low caste origin.

Every brahmana through all ages accepted these texts as profound.

Kalidasa, again of low origins, is also considered some great guy.

Only reason seems to be that enlightened educated people such as we have today were not present then to explain ‘caste’ system and ‘manusmriti’ to bharatiyas.

Thankfully, we live in ‘modern’ times.

“At worst, they smack of ancient caste bigotry, like the unhealthy valourisation of fair skin (as epitomised by embarrassing ads for lightening products) in a country of shining brown-skinned toilers.”

Absolutely!
Shiva, the dark coloured god of hindu pantheon was heard complaining that he does not get any devotees nowadays.
Sri Krishna the other day complained similarly. He asked some lyricist- ‘radha kyon gori, mein kyon kala’ – why is Radha of lighter shade while I am black ?
Sri Rama similarly expressed unhappiness about his dark colour.
Kali ma was also angry on this point.

Last heard, these dark skinned gods were forming an association to petition GoI for some reservation for them among devotees.

The lighter skinned god Brahma, was not available for comment. He could not be found in any temples also, since there are hardly any temples that has Brahma as murti. Whats the point in being the creator and all, even with white skin!

Yet despite this slow erosion of caste as an insidious force, India remains a divided society

The Brits have something to be thankful for in these times of having been turned into chamcha of a has been superpower- US. Their legacy of ‘divide et empera’ is being religiously followed through by ‘educated’ indians.

“Anyone visiting India today would be struck by its chasms of difference. ”
Absolutely. It is proven that anyone who puts on eurocentric lenses will view things in its characteristic tinge.

But in India, the revelations of this latest study are stark reminders of how much division underlies the fabric of the nation, and of how much work remains in perfecting our democratic society.”

Absolutely! The white man’s burden, you know ?
It just got transferred to his brown skinned brother who uses ‘fair and lovely’ and is english educated.